Where Did Afrikaners Go When The British Began Settling In South Africa?

Where Did Afrikaners Go When The British Began Settling In South Africa?

The Afrikaners are a South African ethnic group descended from Dutch, German and French Huguenots who began settling in the Cape Colony in the 1600s. Many of them moved inland to escape British rule in the late 1800s and established their own republics, which later merged to form the Union of South Africa.

When The British Began Settling In South Africa Where Did Many Afrikaners Move

During the 19th century, when the British began to settle in South Africa, many Afrikaners moved out of the Cape Colony and into the interior of the country. The Great Trek was a mass migration of these Afrikaners away from British rule, and they moved into the northern and eastern parts of the country. The Boers, as they were known, established their own independent republics in these areas and the Afrikaners eventually developed the language, culture, and traditions of the region. The Afrikaners were able to maintain their independence until the Second Boer War, when the British finally annexed their republics, and thousands of Afrikaners were sent to concentration camps. Despite this displacement, the Afrikaners were able to preserve their unique culture, language, and traditions in the new regions of South Africa they had settled, ensuring their legacy as an important part of South African history.

History of Afrikaners in South Africa

The history of Afrikaners in South Africa is a long and complex one. Afrikaners, or Afrikaans-speaking people, are descended from the first settlers in the region and are now the majority population in South Africa. They are often referred to as Boers, a term derived from the Dutch word for farmer.

Where Did Afrikaners Go When The British Began Settling In South Africa?

Afrikaners have a long history in South Africa. The first settlers in the region were Dutch traders who arrived in 1652. They established a settlement at the Cape of Good Hope and established the Dutch East India Company, which would eventually become the largest owner of slaves in the region.

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The Afrikaners began to move north in the late 18th century and settled in the Transvaal, an independent Boer republic. This was at the same time that the British began to settle in South Africa, and the Afrikaners were soon outnumbered by the British settlers. This led to a series of wars between the two groups, known as the Boer Wars. The Afrikaners were eventually defeated and their republics annexed by the British.

Despite their defeat, the Afrikaners continued to move into the interior of South Africa, where they established their own independent republics. This was the start of the Apartheid era, where the Afrikaners established a system of racial segregation that would last until the end of the 20th century.

Today, Afrikaners are the majority population in South Africa, making up around 60 percent of the population. Despite the tumultuous history of the Afrikaners, they remain a integral part of South African culture, and their language, Afrikaans, is still widely spoken.

Reasons for Afrikaners moving away when British began settling in South Africa

When the British began settling in South Africa in the late 1700s, many Afrikaners chose to move away. This was due to a number of reasons, including the British’s oppressive policies, the spread of unfamiliar cultural values, and the erosion of traditional Afrikaner lifestyles.

Where Did Afrikaners Go When The British Began Settling In South Africa?

The British brought with them a different set of laws and policies that greatly impacted the Afrikaners. The British introduced the concept of private property, which was a foreign concept to the Afrikaners. This meant that many of their previously shared resources and lands were now off limits to them. The British also imposed taxes on the Afrikaners, which severely limited their economic opportunities.

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The presence of the British also had a profound impact on the Afrikaners’ culture and lifestyle. The British brought with them unfamiliar values and customs, which were in stark contrast to the traditional Afrikaner way of life. This created a sense of alienation and discomfort among the Afrikaners, which further encouraged them to move away.

Finally, the British presence in South Africa led to the erosion of the traditional Afrikaner lifestyle. The British, with their more advanced technology and industry, quickly outpaced the Afrikaners in terms of economic development. This meant that many of the core aspects of the Afrikaner lifestyle, such as agriculture, were made obsolete and eventually phased out.

All of these factors meant that the Afrikaners were increasingly marginalized and left with few opportunities for economic and social advancement. As such, many of them chose to move away from their homeland in search of better opportunities elsewhere. This exodus of the Afrikaners from South Africa is an important part of South African history and serves as a reminder of the impact of colonialism on the native population.

Where the Afrikaners moved to

The Afrikaners, a South African ethnic group of Dutch, German, French, and other settlers, were a major part of the country’s history and culture. But when the British began settling in South Africa in the early 1800s, many of the Afrikaners moved. This migration of Afrikaners was known as the Great Trek.

Where Did Afrikaners Go When The British Began Settling In South Africa?

During the Great Trek, the Afrikaners moved inland away from British influence and occupation. The main destination of the trekkers was the area known today as the Free State. The trekkers also ventured to the Transvaal region, the Orange Free State, and the Natal. The trekkers were largely motivated by their desire to avoid British rule and establish their own independent states.

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The trekkers were largely farmers, and they settled in the Transvaal and the Free State regions. In these regions, they established their own independent states, called the Boer Republics. The Boer Republics were largely self-governed and had their own laws and customs.

The trekkers also spread out to other areas in South Africa, including the Cape Colony, the Natal, and the Orange Free State. In some of these areas, the trekkers established their own communities and towns. In other areas, they moved into the existing towns and blended in with the local population.

The Afrikaners’ migration had a significant impact on South Africa. It changed the demographics of the country, and it established a new culture and identity for the Afrikaners. The Afrikaners’ migration also led to the creation of the Boer Republics, which later became the Union of South Africa and eventually the Republic of South Africa.

The Afrikaners’ migration was an important event in South African history, and it had a lasting impact on the country’s culture and politics. It was a crucial part of the Afrikaners’ identity and history, and it shaped the country’s future.

Conclusion

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In conclusion, when the British began settling in South Africa, many Afrikaners moved away from their traditional homelands into the interior of the country. This was done in order to escape British rule and to maintain their cultural identity and autonomy. This migration of Afrikaners was an important part of South African history, as it led to the formation of the Afrikaner nation and eventually to the establishment of the Republic of South Africa.

Austin Finnan

Austin Finnan is a blogger, traveler, and author of articles on the website aswica.co.za. He is known for his travels and adventures, which he shares with his readers on his blog. Finnan has always been passionate about exploring new places, which is reflected in his articles and photographs. He is also the author of several books about travel and adventure, which have received positive reviews from critics and readers.

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